What does God think of retirement?

Is the concept of retirement in the Bible?

There’s one reference to retirement and it’s in the book of Numbers.  The Levite priests were to retire from their priestly duties at the age of 50.

Besides that, God is silent on the matter.

But he is not silent regarding the concept of work and purpose.

“For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “Plans to prosper you, not to harm you; plans to give you hope and a future.”  Jeremiah 29:11

Crown Financial says that we should view retirement as  an opportunity for “repurposement” rather than a cessation of work.

“The problem with today’s attitude towards retirement is that it completely negates an integral aspect of God’s design – that we were created to work. It also normalizes something that was never intended to be normal – not working.”

So what is our new work?  Our new purpose?

Crown says that the Biblical view of retirement is —

“Freeing up our time to devote to serving others more fully without the necessity of getting paid for it.  It is time to repurpose how and why we invest our time and resources.”

Back to those Levites from the Old Testament.  Upon being released from their duties, they did not join a golf club and work on their chipping and putting; they did not devote hours to perfecting their down-the-line backhand.  (Not that there’s anything wrong with those activities.  I am still trying to get out of a sand trap in less than four attempts!)

The Bible says that the  retired Levites were to “assist their brothers in performing their duties.”

So we retirees can “assist”.  We can assist our church, our neighbors, our families, the homeless, or a cause we are passionate about.

The Bible also says we are to think of the next generation.

“Even when I am old and gray, do not forsake me, O God, till I declare your power to the next generation, your might to all who are to come.”  Psalm 71

So maybe you want to become a “cuddler” — a holder of babies in the NICU of a hospital.

Maybe you want to work with therapy horses, as Joy has done.

Or maybe you can simply devote extra time (which we have) to praying for the sick.

Or if you are a knitter (which I am not), you can make hats or blankets for those in need.

Whether we are knitters, pray-ers, cuddlers, God seems to be saying that our re-purposement is to assist others.

We should, however, take exception to that phrase, “old and gray”.   We may be old, but we don’t HAVE to be “gray”, right?

In fact, I find myself getting more blonde as the years go by — a miracle of Red Sea proportions.

Or a testimony to the skill set of my hairdresser, whom I see with increasing regularity.

 

Today’s Takeaway –

-I just discovered that being a NICU “cuddler” is a sought after role.  Se we need to apply today!

-And it’s OK to get better at exiting a sand trap or becoming blonder with the passing years.  It’s just a matter of knowing what truly matters when it’s all said and done.   And most likely it’s holding a sick or premature baby while sitting in a rocking chair in a NICU.

 

Enjoy the ride!

xox

Barclay and Joy

Know Your Body!!! It’s Speaking To You.

woman standing on mat

Photo by theformfitness on Pexels.com

As a woman, you probably can relate to the dreaded annual tests we all should undergo , that of a mammogram, ultrasound for those of us with dense breasts, perhaps, a PSA, if you are a man of a certain age, and even, my favorite, the colonoscopy.  All joking aside, this was a very tough week for me because I had experienced symptoms associated with colon cancer.  Thank you internet, thank you Web MD, and thank you to my father who helped make me a hypochondriac.

When you know your body well (as you should) you notice subtle changes, patterns, variations from the norm.  From the research I did online, I thought my body was telling me something. GO SEE A GASTROENTEROLOGIST!

With this in my head, I became fixated on the disease and became convinced I had something seriously wrong with me!

Though the prospect of a diagnosis is very scary, it is something you must do if you suspect something is going on in your body.  Early detection is key.  According to WHO (The World Health Organization) each year 8.8 million people die from cancer, many of them are in low income and middle income countries without access to adequate testing. In the United States, we have no excuse and owe it to ourselves and our families to take advantage of diagnostics.

So after preparing with a delicious cocktail of laxative and Gatorade, 32 oz bottles no less, twice (how can anyone consume this much liquid and not barf?!!) As anyone who has ever undergone a colonoscopy, (thank God, they changed the thinking to every 10 years now!) you know being near a toilet the day before is critical!

The day of the test came and I soldiered on. With butterflies in my stomach and negative thoughts of doom and gloom, I drove myself with my husband at my side an hour away to make sure my colon (now  extremely clean!) was healthy.

I didn’t even get a solid sleep during this procedure since no anesthesia was used. I guess this hospital has a shortage of this specialty! It’s Albany, not New York or Chicago!  A sedation of some sort, but I still felt the scope being turned around inside of me and talking between the 2 nurses.  Before I knew it, the procedure was over, routine I’m sure for any gastro doctor.  Diagnosis- all clear!  No polyps, no growths, phew!  I was soo relieved to hear and knew that I could put my worries to bed, at least until some other symptoms crop up pointing to another disease. I am, after all, my father’s daughter.

Today’s Takeaway…

Know your own body.  Don’t ever dismiss anything that seems out of your normal pattern.  That goes for pooping too!

You have one life to live and it’s precious.  Take your annual diagnostic tests every year without fail.  Remember,  early detection can make all the difference.

Enjoy the ride.

xox Barclay and Joy