It’s all on consignment; Living with the end in mind

My mother’s talent as an interior decorator was on full display in her Florida home.  Orchids and art work, antique side chairs and floral love seats, coffee table books and ash trays – all  were placed just-so.  Her home was stunning.  Yet when my mother passed away, Sotheby’s swooped in and itemized each of her cherished possessions on a stark spreadsheet – valuing it all, even the antiques, at pennies on the dollar.

It’s likely that when we die, no one will actually want our stuff.  And here in Naples, Florida, home to the aging baby boomer, this is especially apparent.

Driving on Tamiani Trail, a major north-south route, one notices a glut of consignment stores and high-end thrift shops.  This is where our precious stuff ends up.  And that’s if we’re lucky – most will get carted off to Goodwill.  People want NEW stuff;  older pieces must be discounted to a fraction of their original cost in order to compete.

Now there’s nothing wrong with creating a beautiful space.  The problem arises when stuff becomes our focus, our void-filler, our source of pleasure.  Because some day, some inevitable day, it’s all headed to the consignment store or Goodwill.

John Ortberg likens this reality to playing Monopoly.  Growing up, he often played Monopoly with his grandmother who lived with them.   She was a lovely woman, he says, but she was ruthless at Monopoly and routinely beat him.   Finally, at age 10, he spent a summer playing the game with a friend, and he learned the secret to winning – that it was all about amassing land and money.

That fall he finally beat his grandmother for the first time, hoarding the land,  the hotels, the cash – taking his grandmother’s last dollar.  After her defeat, he says he asked if they could preserve the board.  Maybe forever.  But his grandma had one more lesson to teach him.  “When the game ends – and it always ends,”  she said.  “It all goes back in the box.”  All the red hotels, all the lovely cash, all the property titles.

All our stuff.

Ortberg urges us to keep the end in mind as we go through our short life.  To remember what is temporary, and to strive to invest in what is eternal –  namely, God and people.

Psalm 90:12 says, ‘Teach us to number our days aright, that we may gain a heart of wisdom.”

Jesus said, “For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?”  Mark 8:36

 

So how do we number our days?

By giving thanks for what we have, knowing it is a gift from God – on loan.  We are mere stewards.

By investing in people.  Praying for them. Visiting them in nursing homes, prisons, hospitals, Habitat for Humanity work sites,  or simply in our neighborhood.

Remembering that it all goes back in the box.

Or if we’re lucky, to a consignment store…

 

Today’s Takeaway –

January 25 gave us a tragic reminder of life’s brevity – the sudden taking of Kobe Bryant and his sweet daughter.

All we have is today to invest in that which matters.

As always, enjoy the ride

xox Barclay & Joy

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy 2nd Anniversary, Revisionist Retirement!

Joy here…

So hard to believe that Barclay and I started this blog-www.revisionistretirement.com two years ago this month!  Happy Anniversary to us, and to you, our subscribers!

Who knew how difficult and bumpy this retirement ride would actually be!  Shouldn’t retiring be the finish line of the race you have been running for 30-40 years?  It always seemed so far away, somebody else’s life, not mine!  I was young and would stay forever the girl I saw in the mirror.

It has been a 3-year ride now for Barclay and me.  During that time I have been emotional, depressed, ecstatic, moody, petulant, frustrated, disappointed, and confused (at times, all of these rolled into one!) Now, I think I am in a good place, in my head, in my mind, and in my heart.

What is certain is that reflecting on the process through this blog has been cathartic for us both.  But more importantly, if we have helped ONE person have a smoother ride, then we have accomplished something wonderful!

Soooooo,

We now have a favor to ask you…

 

First a question for those who are retired.

What has been the BEST part about retirement?

What has been the WORST part about retirement?

 

And one more thing…

 

Which of the following topics do you want to hear more about?  

 

___ Aging Well: How to keep your body and brain moving?

____Finding Purpose in Retirement?

____Mental Health?

____A walk down memory lane with Muriel, Ben, Peggy, and Champe?

____Book Reviews?

____Spirituality?

____Parenting and Letting Go?

 

—–Other??


 

 

Today’s Takeaway –

THANK YOU for following this blog!!!

May we continue to enjoy the ride together!

xox Barclay and Joy

 

Image courtesy of https://clipartix.com/retirement-clip-art/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s in YOUR Love Language?

Barclay here –

One of our favorite pastimes is visiting Open Houses on a Sunday afternoon.  Last week my husband and I met Walter, a 70-ish realtor, white-haired and jovial.  “I am actually retired,” he told us.  “I offered to cover this Open House for the homeowner who is a close friend.”  Then he added, “It gives me something to do and I think my wife is happy when I leave the house.”

I’ve heard versions of that statement many times – from the elderly salesman mixing paint at Lowes to the gray-haired gentleman trying to manage a wordy Starbucks order.  “My wife prefers I get out of the house.

Many married retirees are striving to find balance between getting out of the house and enjoying quality time with their spouse — pursuing outlets enough to add to the conversation-table, but not so much that one spouse feels abandoned.  This is tricky as relationships are dynamic and feelings are fragile.  It takes both sensitivity and intentionality.

Joy and I have recently been exploring the 5 Love Languages .  Have you heard of them? Knowing the primary Love Language (LL) of your spouse and becoming fluent in it can enhance your relationship and draw you closer.

We each have a primary LL – the one that, when received, makes us feel loved.  Mine is Words of Affirmation, while my husband’s is likely Quality Time.  Lately here in southwest Florida, we have been hanging pictures together which, like hanging wallpaper, or any home project, can go different directions when measurements don’t align and words veer toward the colorful rather than the affirming. But since my husband and I have been intentional about filling the LL tank, our wall art stayed straight and we ended up giving each other a high five and admiring our handiwork over a beer.

The key is being intentional about the filling and the receiving.  An empty LL tank makes for a dry relationship.  But a full tank can make even hanging pictures a delightful adventure and 35 years of marriage seem like the honeymoon’s just beginning.

So go for it.  Take the quiz and then put it into practice.  The result may mean that people like Walter won’t have to hide out in Open Houses or mix paint at Lowes — unless of course, they can’t wait to tell their spouse about it over wine that evening as she shares about own excursions!

 

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Joy here:

Barclay had mentioned this 5 love languages stuff to me before, but this being a brand new year and a new decade, I figured it was time to give it more consideration. For me, having been married 42 years (hard to believe…yes, I was a child bride!), I occasionally face many of the same issues that I have always faced with my EPS (Ever-Present Spouse). And I have observed that if you don’t address these issues head-on, they won’t go away by themselves.  A wise friend of mine here in Mexico (no names divulged) said, “If you have problems North of the border, you’re still going to have them South of the border.”

As a newly retired person (especially one who’s worked outside of the house for 40 plus years), you may find yourself suddenly spending an inordinate amount of time with your spouse.   It’s a great time to ponder these questions together.

What are our goals in this new phase of life?

What do we still want to accomplish before we die? 

What do we want to explore together as well as on our own? 

How much space  (Me-Time)  do we each need?

The 5 Love Languages site provides a wonderful quiz that helps you answer how you feel about certain things in your relationship with your partner. (Click HERE) .  I took it and while my score was 3 points away from the highest score you can achieve (meaning I have more than one LL), I knew (and had confirmed) that Affirmation – defined as emotional support or encouragement – is the most important action my spouse can show me.

I had my spouse take the test as well.  Interestingly, his score was only a point different from mine (his was actually higher!) and Quality Time was his number one LL, with Affirmation a close second.  His results surprised me.  I had thought Physical Touch would be at the top of the list, but it was actually third.

What this does for a couple is to make it clear what each partner wants from the other.  It’s also a wakeup call that, maybe, you don’t know this person as well as you think you do.

Take the quiz and see what happens.  If nothing else, it’s an interesting exercise!

LL Quiz

Today’s Takeaway…

-Be open to seeing your partner in a new light.  You are not the person you were when you got married, nor is he/she!

-Bearing in mind that you are going to be together a lot more, make the time interesting.  Think of conversation to engage.

-Give each other space.  Sometimes, your partner just wants to know you’re there.  You can be reading in one room and he can be in another on his laptop, or whatever he chooses to do with his time.  Be mindful that you have come through a lot together and there’s much more to come. G-D willing!  Jewish people must say this after every sentence involving health!

-Be happy you have each other because you won’t always!

So…..enjoy the ride and reach for your partner’s hand!

xox Barclay and Joy

 

Happy New Year!

Happy 2020!

Love, love, love from Revisionist Retirement to you, our faithful readers!!

 

Photo by Asad Photo Maldives on Pexels.com